Winner of the December Writing Contest at the Re: fiction Website

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Yay, I’m so happy! I won the Re:Fiction December 2017 Writing Contest!

If you want to read my science fiction short story, here it is:

https://refiction.com/writing-contests/winner-of-the-december-2017-writing-contest

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Yay, I won the awesome Fiction-writing book Giveaway from Re:Fiction!

 

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I’m happy to announce that I won the awesome giveaway from Re:fiction

(More about  Re:fiction at the bottom of this post.)

My prize was an Amazon gift certificate of one hundred euros to buy Fiction-Writing books.

Among many interesting recommendations from Tal Valante from Re:fiction , I had the following Fiction-writing books recommended to me. I didn’t get these only because I already have them, but I would also recommend them as very helpful books:

Wonderbook : The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction by Jeff VanderMeer (Goodreads Author), Jeremy Zerfoss (Illustrator), John Coulthart (Illustrations)

And the Angela Ackerman‘s Thesaurus series

My Fiction-writing book choices were:

 

1) Story: Style, Structure, Substance, and the Principles of Screenwriting by Robert McKee

2) Word Painting Revised Edition: The Fine Art of Writing Descriptively Kindle Edition by Rebecca McClanahan

3) Writing the Breakout Novel: Winning Advice from a Top Agent and His Best-selling Client by Donald Maass

4) The Artful Edit: On the Practice of Editing Yourself by Susan Bell

5) The 12 Key Pillars of Novel Construction: Your Blueprint for Building a Strong Story (The Writer’s Toolbox Series) by C. S. Lakin

6) MASTER LISTS FOR WRITERS: Thesauruses, Plots, Character Traits, Names, and More by Bryn Donovan

7) Make Your Words Work by Gary Provost

Now I wish to find enough time to enjoy all these awesome books! But summer is coming so I’m quite hopeful this will happen.

 

About Re:fiction

” Re:fiction is a fast-growing resource website for writers. We host everything from practical articles and tips to writing prompts and a story idea generator. In our newsletter, you can practice your skills by entering free, prize-bearing writing challenges. Need professional feedback for your work? Try our free editing scholarships.

Our mission statement:
We seek creative people who write with authenticity about a diversity of subjects, all while in pursuit of literary quality. Our mission is to find, nurture, and reward these writers in any way we can.”

 

 

Every writer should have someone to tell them their draft is c**p. (or not good enough)

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Seriously, this is a must in every writer’s bucket list, a brutally honest beta-reader who tells you that he/she didn’t care about your characters, your story had a long list of faults, you must show and not tell and whatever else they have found of extremely badly written in your manuscript draft, especially if you are now starting your writing career and therefore clueless of where you have to improve.

If your writing is a career for you, then you need to study to develop your weak spots, you need feedback and you need to hear your beta-readers, even if he/she was brutally honest and even if the way how he/she manifested his/her opinion made you cringe at the sight of that feedback for a whole month.

I remember when I received that brutally honest feedback. I had swapped beta-reading with another writer, but I couldn’t get her story for two reasons:

First, she didn’t tell me that one of her short stories was a spin-off of a novel from her that I haven’t read, so, not understanding at all where her short story had come from, I found it confusing and with an underdeveloped story world. She should have told me as a beta-reader that I would only understand the short story if I read the novel first.

And second, her protagonist failed to do anything out of her own insecurity and misplaced principles until the end of her story. So the protagonist was arrested, the horrible and well-depicted villain won and the third character, whose goals weren’t clear for me since the start, went on doing nothing apart from being the (impossible to understand) passive love interest of the protagonist. It was a weak story without a fully formed plot where nothing happened. It masqueraded as a tragedy, but at least for me, a tragedy without enough reasons for its sad and inconclusive end. I confess that I don’t like tragedies unless that really makes sense in the context of the character arc. Her story didn’t make sense to me at the time so I was sincere enough to tell her my opinion, taking care though to also point out what I had found of positive in her WIP, so it would be a balanced feedback.

As an answer, she sent me a really long email telling me all the things she had hated in my WIP in a really emotional way. To summarize it, her main points were that my backstory was stupid, my writing was beyond terrible and she didn’t care for the characters or the story at all. Her feedback was much more emotional and negative than what I usually received from other beta-readers, so I concluded that being upset about my previous, not completely positive feedback, had influenced the way how she expressed herself in her answer.

I thanked her for her quite thorough feedback and said nothing about the emotional way she had expressed it. I was astonished that my writing had called such a strong emotional reaction, even if a negative one. So, I decided to ignore the emotional coloring of her feedback and concentrated on the more precise advice buried under all that emotion.

And the advice was:

I had to find ways to bring the reader into my story so the reader would care.
I had to flesh out summarized narrative (Change tell into show) and make better description and settings.
I had to make my characters intriguing even if not likable through a clearer character arc.
I had to break the backstory into smaller bits, weaving it into the plot.
I had to show, not tell.

I accepted that brutally honest feedback regardless of how it was expressed and learned from it, instead of dismissing it completely or being hurt/discouraged by it. The harsh way how the critique was written convinced me to study and try to improve my writing in a way that milder feedback had not. So it was a hard experience, but one that was vital and important for my writing development.

Bucket list item accomplished. 🙂

Of course, there are always exceptions. Once I received feedback where it was clear that my beta-reader was disappointed that my story wasn’t a courageous group of marines shooting around to save the world. So I read his feedback taking that into account. 😉

And you? Have you already received brutally honest feedback?

My 10 favorite blogs on writing

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Here they are, not in sequence, since I like all of them. When I’m looking for writing advice here is where I look. Many of these bloggers have awesome books on writing I surely recommend.

 

1. Helping Writers Become Authors
https://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/

 

2. Live Write Thrive
http://www.livewritethrive.com/

 

3. Writers Write
http://writerswrite.co.za/

 

4. Rayne Hall, Making Good Books Great
http://www.raynehall.com/

 

5. Marcy Kennedy
http://marcykennedy.com/

 

6. Jane Friedman
https://janefriedman.com/blog/

 

7.Writers Helping Writers
http://writershelpingwriters.net/

 

8. What is a plot?
http://www.whatisaplot.com/

 

9. Jami Gold
http://jamigold.com/blog/

 

10. She’s Novel
http://www.shesnovel.com/

Is the first book the hardest to write?

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I could be mistaken, but I consider my current work-in-progress, my first book, the hardest. So by association, I would say the first book is the hardest for most authors, especially if you are strict on yourself and want to make as little beginner mistakes as possible. If you are in love with your story and must make it the best. Once I heard from a famous writer that you probably should start off with a smaller, not so important project and move on later to the stories you are dying to write. I didn’t follow that advice and neither could I, because I usually am passionate about most of my stories, but I still consider that advice wise, even if it’s meant for less impulsive people than me.

On your first book, you have a humongous learning curve. There are so many ways you can improve your writing that I couldn’t make a list of all of them, let alone which one I would consider more important. I could make a list of the books I already looked in topics like Structure, Characters, Viewpoint, Description, and Setting, but apart from books, there are tons of resources on the internet, amazing blogs on writing, videos, podcasts, online courses and so on.

Books are my favorite source of information though because on the internet you often jump from an interesting blog post on writing to facebook and then all your concentration gets lost. And a book will cover a subject in many more pages, in a longer way than any blog post can. And in a book I can underline the most important tips and read them again, I find that easier than jumping back on a video. Again, each one has their own way to learn. For me the less distraction on the side the better.

Together with learning the craft you have to find your own writing system. Once you establish what works for you writing tends to get easier. I wrote my first draft as fast as I could and then I had to establish a certain order to my rewriting process and this proved to be quite time-consuming. There were too many aspects to revise and it looked the first time as too much to juggle. Later I saw I should make a reread for each of the aspects I wanted to improve. It seems like a simple idea, but it took out the overwhelming side of revising out of the way. Now I just need undisturbed revising time to use all the insights I gained so far.

So, was your first book the most difficult? What lessons have you learned with it?