Author Interview – K.M. Herkes

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K. M. Herkes is mostly quiet with a thirty-percent chance of loud, and everything else about her is subject to change without warning. She lives in the Midwest and works in a library, where she gets paid to play with books.  When she isn’t lost in her own imagination or making book recommendations, she’s outside in the garden, up to her elbows in dirt or wielding power tools with enthusiasm.
Professional development has included classroom teaching, animal training, aquaculture, horticulture, retail management, inventory operations, and customer service. Personal development is ongoing. Cats are involved.

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

Two series, so two sentences.

Stories of the Restoration. My characters are fighting to stay alive in a dystopian future that doesn’t look much different from the world of today

Rough Passages. Each story follows someone dealing with superpower-related crises in the present day of an alternate history where superpowers exploded onto the scene overnight in the middle of World War 2.

 

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

The SotR series started off because I wrote a zombie apocalypse book that took place about a hundred years the future. Then I decided I liked the corporate-driven dystopian society I’d created as a setting more than I liked the zombies. So I un-destroyed the world and wrote a ton of other stories in it.

The idea for Rough Passages came from reading a lot of comic books and thinking that superpowers are pretty disruptive. Most stories give powers to young adults who don’t have settled lives, or to people with nothing left to lose. So I dumped powers on people who had full, ordinary lives and jobs and families, just to see what would happen.

 

Which authors have influenced you?

The ones who create the kind of books I like to read most are Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee, Neil Gaiman, and Andre Norton. I love Ray Bradbury too, and I could go on and on. So many authors, so many influences.

 

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Space opera, dystopian science fiction, post-apocalypse stories, and fantasy of all kinds. Also mysteries. I enjoy a good whodunnit or a complicated thriller. I love romances too, although some of those are pretty much fantasies when push comes to shove. And poetry.

I’m a sucker for well-strung together words of any kind I guess.

 

What makes a book/story special for you?

Emotionally-complex characters, and writing that immerses me in the world those characters live in rather than telling me outright what’s going on.

An example: The stench of cheap cologne hit Mary as soon as she got home after work at midnight. That smell, plus the dirty dishes and takeout on the kitchen table, plus Liz’s bra on the bedroom door, added up to a one-night-stand in progress. Mary sighed. This was going to be a long weekend.

That entertains me more than, “Mary could tell Liz had an overnight guest from the mess they’d left everywhere. The woman’s horrible taste in men was almost as irritating as her refusal to pick up after herself. She sighed and resigned herself to another long, annoying weekend.

 

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I live in the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois, but I spent a lot of time on the west coast of the US before my family settled in the Midwest. I set down deep roots into the prairie soil once I got here, that much is certain. I’m sure it’s influenced me but I can’t point to anything specific.

 

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I don’t draft in the currently-accepted sense, so comparing the time spent is like comparing oranges and pineapple upside-down cake.

A first draft of a novel might take six months or two years, but once I write “The End” it will not substantially change in tone, length or storyline. My revisions don’t take long: weeks at most, for a novel 100k words or more. It’s all phrase-polishing, copy-editing, continuity-checks and edits to fix beta-reader concerns. True revision, where I rip story ideas apart, adding or removing plotlines and characters —all that goes on while I’m writing the “first draft.”

I’m not the only one who writes like that, but it’s not a popular system right now. If I dedicate myself to the writing aspect, I can put out a quality novel and a couple of shorts a year, so I’m not sweating how long it takes in the first place.

At least I think they’re good. There are plenty of days where I wonder if I shouldn’t do it the way everyone else does.

 

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

Yes, yes, and yes.  I tried volunteer copy-editors at first, but they missed too much. I’ve never hired a content editor, but that’s because I am an ego monster who chose self-publishing to write my stories my way. I am well aware they have issues. when it comes to commercial appeal and adhering to “standard story forms.” And I will confess that despite copy-editing and proofing there are still errors. I swear typos creep in while no one’s looking.

As far as art goes, I know enough graphic design to know I’m not a good enough artist to do my own words justice. I’ve done my own covers for the Rough Passages shorts out of financial necessity, but I’ll hire a professional for the book cover.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I’ve learned far too much to fit into one short interview. I’ve blogged thousands of words about my experiences. Most of it boils down to this: there is no One Right Way.

 

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

I write for an audience. For most of my life, that audience was imaginary, so I didn’t have much insecurity. The hardest part of my transition from writer to author has been the long wait for real readers to find my words, and the growing, gnawing fear that they’re ignoring me because my writing is awful. That fear has ebbed a bit now that I’ve had a few sales and some professional affirmation.

Still,knowing I have readers waiting inspires me to write more and faster. It’s that simple.

 

What would you do differently on a next project?

What should I do differently? I should be constantly building an audience for it now,  through personal networking online, generating buzz  with social media project updates and talking about my story all the time, and I should treat the finished books as a business product to be marketed, promoted and pushed.

Will I do those things? Probably not. At least,not to the extent the publishing pundits say I should. I have a serious problem enthusing about my work unprompted.

 

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Write. Write regularly and often as possible. Read writers who are better than you are. Write more. Listen to readers who tell you what doesn’t work, because you don’t have to change a single word, but knowledge is power.  Write more.

 

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

I have a website! At dawnrigger.com you can find my writing blog, my book reviews, character art, news and more. I also have a Facebook author page, and I’m on twitter as @doawnrigger. Basically, a user search on dawnrigger finds me on most social media outlets.

 

What are you planning to write/publish next?

Next up is Heartwood, a new Rough Passages Tale, along with a couple of other short stories.  I’ll be publishing a new Restoration novel in autumn if all goes well.

author website chock full o’ fun: dawnrigger.com

books & ebooks available for sale: www.amazon.com/author/kmherkes

 

 

 

Author Interview – C. J. McKee

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I have done some type of art most of my life and graphics as well as web design for the past ten years. I love the creative aspect of graphics and art as well as music. Creativity is utmost in my endeavors. I love to build something new from nothing.

I have been writing short stories and doing other forms of art since I was very young. Math was never my strong suit, but the art of writing? Ah, now that’s what I enjoyed the most. Anything creative appealed to me, and writing gave me so much more than merely painting a picture. I could create anything I wanted using the written word. I wrote mostly Sci-Fi or Fantasy stories, short but sweet. I have written other stories which I will post here so you can read and enjoy. I always have some form of writing going on which ranges from non-fiction to fiction.

QUESTIONS

-How would you describe your story in one sentence?

With the aide of Galddor the Dragon Sage, the Realms of Arydd are ruled by Dragons who watch over the land and beings to ensure their world is not destroyed by those who would use the land for dark purposes.

 

-What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

I had always read stories of dragons where they were hoarders or attacking villages or just plain evil. I wanted to write a novel or series where dragons were good and friendly toward humans and other beings alike.

 

-Which authors have influenced you?

Ray Bradbury, JRR Tolkien

 

-Which are your favorite literary genres?

Fantasy and Science Fiction

 

-What makes a book/story special for you?

Creating a world with characters that come alive and you get attached to.

 

-Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

Montana. I’ve always loved the mountains and thus the reason the dragons who rule the realms live and from where they can watch over the land.

 

-How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

It all depends on how much time I have to write. Total a few months or so. The first book has been written for years from original conception to editing.

 

-Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I did the cover designs. The editing/proofing was done by a professional editor.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

-Oh yes they did. In some cases the storyline or characters took on a life of their own and went down a direction I wasn’t expecting. I’ve learned to be open-minded. Sometimes things an editor suggest can be a great addition or change. Also I learned more about writing in general from editors, things that have helped my writing improve.

 

-What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

Music inspires me as does reading and role playing games. I always listen to Celtic music when writing. That and my Scottish heritage.

 

-What would you do differently on a next project?

Probably not much than I did on my last book. I will continue to grow and learn more, I don’t believe you ever stop.

 

-Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Get an editor when you’re done with the initial writing, or when you feel it’s ready to be edited. No matter how well you think you did, it’s important to have an editor go through it. It can cost you a bit, but it’s totally worth it. Learn as much as you can about social networking and the resources that are out there to help you get your book into the hands of readers.

 

-Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

They can go to my website www.mountaindragonmedia.com and I’m also on facebook:.  https://www.facebook.com/authorcjmckeeofficialpage   as well as twitter:  @MtDragonMedia

 

-What are you planning to write/publish next?

I am currently working on my third book in the Dragon Sage Chronicles; The Goblin Queen

 

Author Interview – Kindra Sowder

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Kindra Sowder was born and raised in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA until the age of 12, when her family moved to Spartanburg, SC. She graduated from high school in 2006 Me with full honors and as a member of her high school Literary Club and the Spanish Honor Society. In January 2014, she graduated with her second degree in Psychology, earning her an AA and BA in the field. She began to write long before this though, forming the basis for the Executioner Trilogy at the age of 15. She got married to her husband Edd Sowder in May 2014 and still lives in Spartanburg, SC where she is basing Burning Willow Press. “Follow the Ashes” has earned her nominations in the following categories: Best YA Author, Best Cover Art (cover art by Lisa Vasquez), and Best Female Indie Author in the IAFC Awards! Her work “Hello, My Name is…: A Miss Hyde Novella Volume 1” has also been nominated for Book of the Day’s 2015 Summer Book Awards Best in Horror Award.

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

A big city girl trying to make it in the indie world!

 

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

I am inspired by a lot of things. Music mostly. I can listen to a song and it invokes the image of a story in my mind that I write down as soon as it floods in. I have a tendency to stick with certain genres such as erotic horror, science fiction, Dystopian fiction and dark fantasy.

 

Which authors have influenced you?

Absolutely! I have been influenced by some of the greatest minds in literature including Stephen King, Anne Rice, Charlaine Harris, and Laurel K. Hamilton. (I have been compared to all of them)

 

Which are your favorite literary genres?

My favorite literary genres are the same ones I write in: Horror, science fiction, Dystopian fiction, and dark fantasy.

 

What makes a book/story special for you?

The characters. Always the characters. I need to be able to connect with them. If I can’t, the story means nothing. It may be a great story but you need great characters that readers can relate to to make it the best it can be.

 

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I currently live in Spartanburg, SC. My hometown is actually Los Angeles, which has greatly influenced me. The Executioner Trilogy is based there as well as a new series I am writing. Another series is based where I live now.

 

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I have to say that time varies from book to book. Some have taken me a year. Some have taken me a month. Some have taken three months. It’s hard to put down an exact number.

 

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I do. My current cover artist is Loraine Van Tonder. Lisa Vasquez did the first two books of the Executioner Trilogy. I don’t use any editor in particular. I also have a beta reader who helps me with voice, plot points, etc. named Charles Leeland. he is also my biggest fan.I also have my PA Samantha Achaia who has been an amazing helper along the way.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I had heard that the literary scene was a hard place, but I learned very quickly that everyone was right. It’s hard to get your work published, but even harder to get your work recognized. I have to say that one unexpected event while I’ve been in the industry is losing my first cover artist.

 

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book? Again, music. it always helps. And if I have writer’s block I turn on a playlist, which I make specifically for each work, and the words start flowing again. My biggest hurdle has been the use of passive voice, which I am trying to curb.

 

What would you do differently on a next project?

I am already doing so many different things with each new project. Where do I even start?

 

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Read, read, read….Always. It helps you develop and learn as a writer. Also, write every day. What you put down may not be great, it may be amazing, or complete and utter garbage, but keep writing.

 

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

I can be found on FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and at my websitewww.ksowderauthor.com. I also have a blog called “Inside the Mind of Kindra Sowder.”

 

What are you planning to write/publish next?

I have about five works in progress as of right now. I am working on two series, the new installment to the Miss Hyde Novellas, as well as a secret project I’ll be announcing next month so keep a look out.

 


    


  

 

Author Interview – Chasity Nicole

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Writing became a big part of my life in 2005 when a friend (Author Misti Blake) and I began writing stories with one another. I was still in high school at the time and we would write just for the fun and pure joy we experienced through writing. My writing took a bit of a hiatus when I finished high school and started college to earn my degree in Criminal Justice. That didn’t last very long, because a few months after starting college I was diagnosed with Tourette’s syndrome in 2009. Months later I found out the only thing that helped keep my ticks at bay was writing, and I picked the art back up. Wickedly Misunderstood was the first novel I began writing after my diagnosis and it all started with a dream. My advice to everyone is to find something that you love doing and do it. Don’t let anyone tell you can’t do it, because if you love it enough you’ll succeed. Do what you love, and love what you do. You never know what your dreams can lead you to accomplish.

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

 

  • One crazy rescue mission to save your friend and the love of your life.

 

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

 

  • So the Valhaven Island Trilogy all started with a dream I had one night several years ago. I dreamt of a girl named Ember who had superhuman powers and watched her story unfold in my dreams and decided I’d type it up the next day and it just kept flowing into what it is today. As for most of the characters they are based off of friends, or at least the main roles in the story are based off of close friends and those that have impacted my life in some way.

 

Which authors have influenced you?

 

  • This is a tough question. A lot of authors have influenced me to write. I think my biggest influencers are Lewis Carrol and J.K. Rowling. Lewis Carrol is my favorite author. Misti Blake, a fellow indie author, is also a major influence for me because the days I really struggle she’s in my head screaming at me to keep moving forward. After all, if it wasn’t for writing with her in high school, my love for writing stories might not have reached the level of where it is today.

 

Which are your favorite literary genres?

 

  • Primarily, my novels are fantasy based. I do have short stories that are horror in nature as I don’t have a problem writing a seven-thousand word horror short story, I just can’t seem to get a full-length novel (although I’ve never actually tried). I’d say fantasy, sci-fi, and teen are typically where I dwell as far as reading goes as well. I like to stay in my imaginary world as much as possible.

 

What makes a book/story special for you?

 

  • If I can get hooked on a book really quick to where I can’t put it down then that book is golden for me. Lately, I’ve been in a reading funk, but I’m in the middle of releasing a novel and doing book trailers and covers and the holidays are approaching, so the funk is bound to happen. The ideal book for me has short chapters that aren’t over ten pages in length, because nothing is more frustrating than a chapter that’s forty pages long and you have to stop halfway through because of life. So, I like short, quick chapters that I can read quickly before life comes knocking at my door.

 

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

 

  • I live in good ‘ole North Carolina. My hometown didn’t influence this upcoming novel coming out but it is the basis for a novel I have in the works that I plan to release in the future. I grew up in Mount Pleasant, NC. And there are a few characters in the Valhaven Island Trilogy that are from NC but not from my hometown, and the character who is a derivative of myself isn’t from NC. But, a nice little twist does happen in Wicked Rescue Mission and you find out where Ember’s parents are originally from, and I don’t want to give that away.

 

How long did you need to write this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

 

  • I’d say a little over a year and a half. I planned to release this past June but because my wedding was also in June my novel release got pushed back because I didn’t have the time to finish it and plan my wedding. Editing took around three-ish months. Designing the cover was the easiest thing and that took maybe a week, if that.

 

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

 

  • I’m a cover artist, so I do my own cover work. I also have a few friends that I trust to edit my work and my group is amazing and I wouldn’t trade them for anything in the world.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

 

  • I’ve learned that I’m my biggest critic and that I’m always going to think the worst of things. It’s just how my brain works, and I’ve come to learn that most writers have this same mentality. As I said earlier, my novel was supposed to release in June, but because my wedding was in June I couldn’t devote the time to writing my novel and planning my wedding. So, I planned my wedding and set the novel aside for a little bit. There’s a lot of unexpected things that can pop up; hard-drive failures, losing your notebooks, pens dying while at work, etc.

 

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

 

  • My husband, mom, friends, and fans. I have friends that have read the book and they’ve messaged me wanting to know what happens next and they’ve been upset that it’s taken me over a year to publish the second book of the trilogy. They’ve been my drive to get it out there, because I go through times of just wanting to throw in the towel and give up. But, I think of those who want to know what happens next and that drives me to finish the story so I don’t have any straggling readers who have unanswered questions, because nothing is worse than having unanswered questions.

 

What would you do differently on a next project?

 

  • Committing more time to writing and less time to distraction. I allow myself to get distracted far too easily, and I think I’ve figured out a way to solve this problem, at least for my nano story. I’ve been streaming me typing it live for the last few days and because I’m streaming I’m not going to other sites when I should be typing. But, when I’m working on longer novels, like the last book in this trilogy I handwrite it, so I wouldn’t really be able to stream it as well.

 

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

 

  • If you want to write and have ideas the best advice I can give you is to just write. Don’t worry what the world will think of what you have to say and don’t worry how it sounds. Don’t worry about grammar and things of that nature because that’s what editing is for. Just write your story and get it told, and worry about tightening it all up once you have it written. If you do it as you go, you’ll forget half your story and you’ll grow to dislike what you’re writing.

 

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

 

 

What are you planning to write/publish next?

 

  • Next I plan to publish a novel called The Moonstone Fairy which is my Nano story. I hope to release it around June or July next year and plan to release Rebuilding the Misunderstood, Book Three of the Valhaven Island Trilogy by the end of next year. I also have some anthologies coming out next year as well. We’ve all Been There: Tales of Tenacity April, 2016 and Carolina Horror Stories.

 

 

 

 

Author Interview – Mike Wolff

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Hailing from the Great Lakes region of the United States, I started writing to kill the boredom of my daily lunch hour. Fascinated by Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror since an early age, I use early influences such as Zelazny, Feist, Eddings, Goodkind, Star Wars and Star Trek to fashion my stories. I believe in Bigfoot, Space Men and I am a proud Christian, so that should tell you where I’m coming from.
I find humor in many parts of life, both dark and not, and try to sprinkle these elements into my writing. Although I take my writing very serious, I try not to be too serious about what I write. My readers should be engaged, remain interested and have fun all at the same time.  Currently, I live in Indiana with my wife of 21+ years and our 3 children.  I have worked in the exciting world of regulated industry, including pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers for the last 18+ years, and although it can be boring at times, I enjoy what I do.

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

Since I have more than one story, it would be hard to encompass them all in one sentence, but if I were to try it would be something like this… My stories are a collection of twisted tales including science fiction, fantasy and horror, with a splash of terribly punny humor, unless it’s not. And yes, I mean punny, not funny…I love a good or bad pun.

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

Most of my stories are based on some sort of dream I’ve had and remembered enough to develop it into a story. In some instances, my stories have started out as a challenge or a suggestion from a friend or family member. My first story The Ancients, started out as a challenge from my sister to write a Haiku about a wombat. A story in my upcoming release, Twisted Tales Volume 2, is about zombie chickens. That idea was suggested by a coworker. When inspiration hits, I chase after it until it’s captured.

Which authors have influenced you?

Influenced is such a strong word…I’d like to say my writing style is my own, so in that instance, I don’t feel like I’ve been influenced by anyone. Having said that, the first book I ‘loved’ was Nine Princes in Amber by Roger Zelazny. I read that when I was 13 and have been reading Fantasy and Science Fiction ever since. I don’t read much horror, but I love ‘old school’ horror from the 80s and I’m a big fan of some of the harshest Heavy Metal out there. So that probably influences my horror writing.

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Fantasy is, by far, my favorite genre. I do read Science Fiction and I’ve been reading a lot more Urban Fantasy and some Horror lately, but Fantasy is the best in my opinion.

What makes a book/story special for you?

Characters and plot. I love a character I can relate to in some way. It helps if they are developed just enough for me to become attached. I like a story where I care about the character enough to read more. And plot is a major component for me. Yeah, who wouldn’t want the plot to be good, right? What I’m saying is that I need to actually be interested in the plot. There are a lot of great books out there that I’ve never read because the plot doesn’t draw me in.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influence your story?

I spent the first 37 years of my life in Michigan. I’ve spent the last 8 years in Indiana. I miss Michigan daily. For me, Michigan is part of me. If you feel that way about your home state/country, then you know what I mean. And it has influenced my stories greatly. Many of my stories take place in Michigan, or Michigan-like settings.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

That’s a hard question to answer. I’ve never really kept track, because I only write over my lunch hour. I rarely touch my computer when I’m at home. I have occasionally written while waiting in airports or in hotel rooms while I’ve been on business trips, but most of my writing is on my lunch hour. That being said, I can create a short story in a single day, or a full-length story in a year or more.

Edits take a bit longer, because that is also done on my lunch hour. Reading and re-reading my own stories takes some time. There are always things I’d like to change, but at some point I need to stop and move on in the process. So editing a story can take a week or a month…maybe two.

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I’m a one-man operation. Unfortunately, the sales haven’t increased sufficiently to hire a professional, so I do it all myself. I have a friend that is a wizard with graphic design, so he helps me when I get stuck on my covers and I have a few friends that I use as beta-readers, but the rest is me.

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happen?

What I learned is that while the process can be frustrating at times, I love every minute of it. I’ve also realized that the actual writing is the easy part. Over the last 2 years, I have released 4 books, both in ebook and paperback formats. I have learned ways to make the process smoother and less time consuming, but each book has been a challenge of its own. Getting that cover design to be the exact pixel size was difficult, until I got one done and then just reused it as a template. The same holds for the formatting of the ebook. Once one is done, just cut and paste; much less work that way. What I’m basically saying is enjoy the process, including all aspects of it. You’re writing and publishing a book. That’s awesome in and of itself.

What helps you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

I read a lot. If I find that I’m stuck on my own projects, I put them aside and I read. Seeing what others have accomplished gets me motivated to do the same.

What would you do differently on a next project?

I would do more editing and involve more beta-readers if possible. Since I do all my own editing, I don’t catch everything. With the assistance of a good group of beta-readers, you can flush out more inconsistencies and grammatical errors.

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Simply write. Don’t just think about it, do it. First and foremost, write to make yourself happy. Do it if you enjoy it. If you are writing to ‘make money’ you may need to re-think why you are writing. Sure, you can make money at it, but if that is the reason you are going into writing, you may be disappointed. But, if you write to make yourself happy, you will have the satisfaction of that, and you may just find an audience for your stories. But you’ll never find that audience if you don’t write.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

I have a writer’s blog, a Twitter account and an Amazon page. I do my best to keep everyone up to date on what I’m doing in my writings, but I use it mostly as a Reviewers blog…and I do a few interviews too.

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00IEE9TBA

https://metallicwolff.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/metallicwolff

What are you planning to write/publish next?

Currently I am editing Twisted Tales Volume 2. This is my second collection of Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror short stories. I really like this collection. There are definitely some stories that are different than anything I’ve written before. I’m looking forward to seeing it published. Additionally, I’ve started writing another fantasy novel. It’s titled Brotherhood of the Locust: Rise to Power. It’s based on a dream I had a few years ago and I’m just now sitting down to develop it. No puns, no mythical creatures or animals as main characters…sort of my first true fantasy novel. It should be fun.

Author Interview – Carol Van Natta

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Carol Van Natta is an independent author of science fiction romance, including Overload Flux, Minder Rising, and Zero Flux, the first in a new series, and Hooray for Holopticon, a retro science fiction comedy. Overload Flux won a 2015 SFR Galaxy Award.  She shares her Fort Collins, Colorado, home with a sometime mad scientist and various cats. Any violations of the laws of physics in her books are the fault of the cats, not the mad scientist.

How would you describe your series in one sentence?

In my science fiction romance Central Galactic Concordance series, peace has reined for 200 years, but an all-powerful government agency, above-the-law corporations, and evolutionary change are about to bring about the old curse, “May you live in interesting times.” Come along for the ride!

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

A Big Damn Story Arc took over my brain one summer and wouldn’t let me go. The resident Mad Scientist, my significant other, was convinced my computer had enslaved me, but he was kind enough to feed me regularly anyway. I wrote the story arc and the universe to go with it. If I’m calculating correctly, it’ll need nine(!) books to complete, which should keep me off the streets and out of the karaoke bars for the next few years.

Which authors have influenced you?

I’m undoubtedly the product of a dozen influences, but I’ll name two. Lindsay Buroker’s Emperor’s Edge fantasy series showed me how to handle a recurring cast of characters and make them fun and interesting, while tracking a bigger plot. Nalini Singh’s Psy-Changeling series showed me the power of romance in giving added emotional weight to an overarching plot. Both series deal with major societal change, which is what my aforementioned Big Damn Story Arc is all about.

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Science fiction is my home base, but I also love fantasy, paranormal, mystery, action-adventure, and suspense. My muse is similarly inclined.

What makes a book/story special for you?

I’m mostly likely to cherish and re-read the stories where everything works together — the characters, the plot, the logic, the pacing, and the emotional arc. It’s a simple and as difficult as that. The books I remember are usually later in a series, where long-running story lines pay off, or where justice is finally delivered, or the main characters finally find love and happiness.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I share my Fort Collins, Colorado home with the resident mad scientist and various helpful cats, and have mostly lived in the western half of the U.S. It’s inevitable that my culture has influenced my stories, but half the fun of science fiction is imagining how things will change. In my series, humans haven’t run across any intelligent life, so they’ve been free to expand across the galaxy and terraform any compatible planets they like. Cultures have blended, but my characters speak a multiple languages and have a variety of cultural experiences.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

The first novel, Overload Flux, took about 13 mos. from first draft to having a manuscript ready to publish. The second novel, Minder Rising, took about 7 mos., in part because it’s a little shorter, and in part because I learned a lot writing the first book. The novella I published in September,Zero Flux (a sequel to Overload Flux) took about 3 mos., mostly because I had to keep wrestling with it so it would stay short—my muse loves big plots.

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

Yes, I hired both editors and cover artists. I also have a cadre of brave beta readers who find the obvious typos and plot holes, so when I send the manuscript to the editor (the estimable Shelley Holloway), she can work her magic. As to covers, I absolutely love fully illustrated covers (as opposed to photo manipulation), so I hired the very talented Stephen Bryant at SRB Productions. I wanted my covers to communication the genre, and to have flavors of space opera movie posters, and he delivered. Hiring professionals is a good business decision, since I’m competing with other books that have been through the same process, but it’s also a matter of pride—I want my books to look and read their best.

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I’ve learned there is no one, right way to do things, and that anyone who tells you they know how the publishing business will change in the next few years is selling something. Traditional publishers aren’t interested in my books, because they don’t think science fiction romance is profitable. If I wrote another, more “marketable” series, I’d listen to a traditional publisher’s offer, but I’d want a very close look at what they’d be doing in exchange for the huge percentage of royalties and tying up the rights for years on end. I like being in charge of my own destiny, wherein I pay for the mistakes but I profit from doing what’s right for my readers.

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

The aforementioned Big Damn Story Arc was so wonderful, it made me want to read the books. Since the cats categorically refused to write them, the task fell to me.

What would you do differently on a next project?

With each book I write, I learn new things, from what tools to use or how to motivate myself to write, to release timing, to crafting the best possible blurb. I take those lessons learned an apply them forward, so I get better with each project.

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Write. You can’t edit what you don’t write, and you can’t sell what you don’t write. It doesn’t have to be good, or  usable , or even saleable, but it all starts with getting it out of your head and into words on the screen or page. Free bonus advice: Treat your writing as a business from day one, not an art or a hobby. It’ll make future decisions more obvious, and make it easier to weather the slings and arrows of snarky reviews.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

Website: http://Author.CarolVanNatta.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarolVanNattaAuthor

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3980825.Carol_Van_Natta

Blog: http://author.carolvannatta.com/blog/

What are you planning to write/publish next?

My work in progress is Pico’s Crush, book 3 in the CGC series. It closes off a mini-arc of character and plot, and leads to the next book in the series.Pico’s Crush involves combat robots, sabotage, mercenaries and jack crews, and killer academic politics, and should be out in January 2016. After that, I might try a serial format for book 4.

CGC_series_ad_Nov2015

Author Interview – J. M. Turner

SUNP0025

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

The Seelie Princess is about Clary, who has been brought up as a human child but really comes from a land called Seelie; a fact she discovers when one of Seelie’s arch-enemies finds her on Earth and tries to steal the powers that Clary doesn’t know she has.

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

My daughter, who had an unfortunate experience with a teacher when she was at primary school.

Which authors have influenced you?

JK Rowling for the world she created (like many, I suspect!), Terry Pratchett whose Discworld writing was sublime.

Which are your favorite literary genres?

I write for children in the fantasy/fairy tale genre but my own favourite (adult) reads vary enormously.  I love the above-mentioned authors (particularly Sir Terry with his fabulous Discworld), enjoy Charlaine Harris (vampires and shapeshifters – the Living Dead series), Tess Gerritson (crime) and some romance (if I’m in the mood for that!)  There are also some truly amazing Indie authors whose work I love, particularly in the Fantasy arena.

What makes a book/story special for you?

One that draws me in to the story instantly.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I’m from the U.K. so my stories are inevitably set here because it’s familiar.  Some parts of this country are truly beautiful.  I’d love to be able to write something set in a different country/culture but would never do it because I’d be bound to get something terribly wrong and inadvertently cause horrendous offence!

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I wrote the first book in just over three months; revision and editing took a further two.  I sent it out to be proof-read and edited and revised accordingly in the areas that I agreed needed to be revised.  The second book was written in two months – it pretty much wrote itself, which sounds daft, but I started and the words just appeared on the page.  It’s been out for editing/proofreading and I’m now finalising it for publication at the end of this month.

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I am lucky enough to know a proofreader and editor who helped me with this.  My first book cover was created on KDP as I was totally broke and couldn’t afford to do it any other way.  It will probably change once the series is complete!  The second book cover was created with the tremendous help of Roy Mauritsen who read that I was having problems with creating one and kindly stepped in to help.  We ‘met’ through a fabulous group on Facebook and he is a brilliant author in his own right, as well as an artwork master.  Check his Shards of the Glass Slipper site – you’ll swoon!

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

Writing is the fairly easy part – editing is not.  Revisions and re-writing are hard work, but doing it helped my work tremendously.  Publishing via KDP was unexpectedly easy – in fact, too easy as the first issue of The Seelie Princess went live with a couple of awful bloopers that weren’t caught (I am so sorry, to those of you that bought/downloaded this original version – let me know via jillturner1960@outlook.com and I’ll send you over a PDF of the proper version!)  What struck me as unusual was that nobody, and I mean nobody, told me that these bloopers existed!  They were just kind of… accepted and ignored.  It’s much better now (not perfect – no book is ever going to be perfect to the person that wrote it – but the bloopers are gone!)

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

My daughter.  As I mentioned, she had a problem at school which was the main inspiration for the first book in the series, as it had a huge effect on her at the time.  I wanted to put my main character in a similar(ish) position and then let her gain the upper hand.  The main hurdle was finding the time to put it down.  I wrote at all hours of the day and night – whenever I had a spare hour or so.  I was as sleep deprived as a new mother!  (Still am as the new release beckons!)

What would you do differently on a next project?

I’m tentatively branching out into writing books for younger children at the moment.  I used to work in early years and know how important it is to spark an interest in reading with children from 4 to 7 years.  It’s the most important life skill they can learn.  A child with an imagination will go far in life!

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Don’t be overwhelmed by the idea of writing a book – just tell your story! Get it down, then put it away for a couple of weeks or so before you re-read it.  You can pick up a lot of errors that way and can also see where it needs to be expanded or revised.  Also, do a spell and grammar check – nothing loses readers quicker than a poorly spelled, book!  Get the ‘their, there, they’re’ kind of thing nailed.  Use a thesaurus.  Do a search to see how many times you have used the word ‘very’, then change it – for example: change ‘she was very hungry’ to ‘she was ravenous’ – it makes for more interesting reading.  Get it edited.  Join writers groups on social media – the advice and confidence boosts these places give out is an amazing help for a new writer.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

authorjmturner.wordpress.com/  this is my blog – you’ll find I write about things that interest me, whinge about the world (occasionally!), give out info about my books and any offers/competitions that I have running in relation to new releases.   I have also recently added a section which offers reviews of books I have read and liked that I think you might enjoy.

www.facebook.com/authorjillturner I post on here quite frequently with updates of what’s happening with me, artwork I like, other author offers, my own offers (and occasional freebies) and things that make me smile!

twitter.com/JillMTurner

jillturner.net my original website which has been somewhat superseded by my blog!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Jill-Turner/e/B0142S490M/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0 this is my author page on Amazon where you can buy my books –

What are you planning to write/publish next?

Book two of The Seelie Princess Trilogy Rise of the Dragons is due for publication on October 31st 2015 and can be pre-ordered from 21st October on Amazon.  Check my author page for details.

Rise of the Dragons bookcover

Author Interview – S. J. Delos

S.J. Delos

S.J Delos was born in the Piedmont Triad region of North Carolina and raised on a steady supply of books and comics. At the age of 14, he decided that telling stories was as enjoyable as reading them and set about weaving his own fantastical worlds.

In his non-writing life, he has been a banquet planner, a country club manager, a car salesman, and an accountant.

He currently lives in Greensboro, North Carolina with his extremely patient wife, two rambunctious children, and an enormous collection of comic books.

So Not a Hero is his debut novel.

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

An action-packed tale of a super-villain attempting to become a hero.

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

I have been into comics and superheroes my entire life. I thought it might be fun to write a story that shows some of the darker sides of that world and points out the tropes prevalent in the genre.

Which authors have influenced you?

Stephen King, Jim Butcher, Charlene Harris, Kim Harrison, Simon R. Green

Which are your favorite literary genres?

I’ve been a horror and mystery fan pretty much since I learned to read. It’s only been in the last ten years or so that I’ve become immersed in urban fantasy and science-fiction.

What makes a book/story special for you?

When the author knows how to talk to their audience. When I can pick up a book and immediately identify with the protagonist (and sometimes the antagonist) without much effort, then I know the author wrote from their heart.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

Greensboro, North Carolina. My debut novel is set in the nearby city of Charlotte, NC and nearly all of my short stories not set in other time periods or other planets have a North Carolina setting.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I began So Not a Hero on November 1, 2014 as my National Novel Writing Month project. It was published on Amazon on May 19, 2015.

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I hired a friend to do my cover art and relied on fellow writers as my proofreaders and editors. Looking back, I wish I’d have sent it off to a professional editor before publication for that last little bit of polish.

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I learned writing the book is actually easier than marketing and promoting it. I’ve been fortunate to have friends who enjoyed my story and have pushed it on their social media. Next time around, I plan on getting the marketing groundwork in place before actually publishing.

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

Whenever I found myself getting stuck or unsure as to what to do next, I would read some comic books. Just relaxing in a world of superheroes and villains provided me with the push to continue working on my own little world.

What would you do differently on a next project?

Plan a little better. I have a tendency to write my chapters and scenes out of order, based on what new idea or sequence has come to me. Then I have to try to bridge all the various parts to make the plot flow smoothly. Next time, I’m going to map out the main points and try to stick to writing chronologically.

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Just write. Don’t worry about making the perfect story in the first draft. That’s what revisions are for. If you’ve got a story you desire to share, make it. Don’t worry if it’s going to be good or original. Write from your soul and there’ll be people wanting to read it.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

I don’t have a website at the moment. The best place to reach me is on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/sjdelos

What are you planning to write/publish next?

I am currently working on two projects simultaneously. One is Some Kind of Hero, a sequel to my first novel. The other is the first book in an urban fantasy series entitled Darkening of the Light.

SNaH Cover

Author Interview – Laura Woodswalker

selfie with book small

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

Visionary inventor Nikola Tesla sent a message to Mars…what happened when they answered?

*What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

The protagonist himself. Nikola Tesla invented the modern electrical system, so he is practically the father of the “industrial age”. He also had an otherworldly side. He reported visions of “beings of light”, and believed that he had received a message from extraterrestrials on his radio equipment. When I read his story, I thought “this is a science fiction story that practically writes itself”.

And yet until recently this man’s name was in no schoolbooks and nobody had even heard of him. Those who did, tended to dismiss him as a ‘crackpot’.  Very few authors had written serious novels with Tesla as a protagonist. His story just cried out to be written. I wanted to get inside his head; see what he thought and felt. Yes, it is science fiction and I did take liberties with the historical facts. I stretched the timeline and the facts, and I explained all of it in my historical notes. So, this is a book where you can learn some history, while having a good time.

After decades of rejections from the Pro publishers, I had given up on writing. But this story just wouldn’t leave me alone, and so I had no choice but to pick it up and run with it.

*Which authors have influenced you?

Isaac Asimov, Sherri Tepper, Orson Scott Card, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Theodore Sturgeon, Clifford Simak, Zenna Henderson, Ursula leGuin.

*Which are your favorite literary genres?

Science Fiction, Fantasy, Historical fiction and combinations of these.

*What makes a book/story special for you?

I identify with outcasts, so I like stories about exceptional people–geniuses, people with special talents and gifts–who don’t quite fit in to their societies. I like a well-crafted plot, and a definite ending (I don’t care for cliffhangers). What makes a story really special is that “sense of wonder” that SF used to have. I used to love novels with advanced aliens who are more evolved than us. If I could find a story about aliens that are not horrifying monsters… a story that gave me a bit of hope, instead of a cloud of gloom and doom…that would truly be a special book. This is the kind of book I am trying to write.

*Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I live in the Eastern part of the US, nearl Philadelphia. My hometown and culture did influence my story. One of my major characters is a Russian-Jewish refugee, Clara,  who has a talent for electrical science and who  insists on working with Nikola. She is named after my grandmother who came from Russia. Clara uses Yiddish expressions which my grandparents used. The grandparents lived in New York City, so I felt comfortable writing about this setting. My brother and I loved to ride the subways, and I wrote several climactic scenes where New Yorkers hid from the invading aliens in the NY tunnels.

My hometown of State College also appears in the book. This college town is set in a rural area amid beautiful mountain ridges. It seemed a perfect place for my characters to hide out when things got a bit too hot in the big city. My beloved mountains were a perfect setting for Tesla to set up a Magnifying Transmitter, followed by a fierce battle with alien attack ships.

*How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I started writing ‘Tesla’s Signal’ in Oct. 2013, and finished my first draft on Dec. 30. For the next year and a half, I did rewrites, revisions and edits. I was ready to publish in April 2015.

*Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I had a few beta readers who gave me some developmental feedback, and I hired a literate family member to proofread. I believed I had the skills necessary to do the majority of the editing myself.  I’m a veteran of the Philadelphia SF Writers’ Workshop, where your story gets critiqued by 10 or 12 people. After years of this, I learned to anticipate what the critics would say about sentence structure, continuity, clarity etc.

I I have heard many people say you cannot write a good book without a professional editor, so I will have to let the readers decide. So far, I have a 4.5 star rating on Amazon and none of my reviewers have complained about poor editing, grammar, spelling or story flow.

I also did my cover art. I have a degree in computer graphics/desktop publishing and have worked for several years in the graphics field. I’m enough of a Photoshop whiz that I would not be happy with myself if I couldn’t do my own cover. And since doing that, I have made quite a few ‘promo’ graphics, and I’m working on a video.

*What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I learned more about electricity and radio than I ever thought possible. (Thank you, Wikipedia and YouTube!) Of course I became an expert in Tesla, the Gilded Age, and the early 1900s. I also researched the geography and history of New York City, where much of the story takes place.

Formatting a Createspace manuscript was a new experience. I learned how to set up style sheets, page breaks etc. Producing an actual print book was enjoyable and satisfying for me because of my background in graphic design.

Many unexpected things happened during the Kindle process. I initially paid for Kindle formatting. I was unsatisfied with the result, and had to teach myself a crash course in Kindle.

The whole marketing process was unexpected for me. I didn’t think about buying advertising. Somehow I thought that all of the Tesla fans on the internet would rush out and buy my book. LOL!

And of course I had to learn about Twitter, Pinterest and even Reddit.

*What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

I was inspired by Nikola himself. He was a workaholic who would not give up. He worked insane hours and rarely slept. There were several times where I was stuck on a plot point and avoided the project for awhile. One time I heard Nikola’s voice in my head, saying “why aren’t you writing my story?”

In general I have learned that you must take breaks. If you’re stuck, work on a craft or music project while you toss the ideas around in your head. Eventually, sit down with a pen and paper, and start scribbling ideas. Mainly, just don’t give up.

*What would you do differently on a next project?

I would probably not include so much historical detail. People say it is “slow”. (But they also want ‘background’. Go figure…)  Also, I might try to plan out my Launch better. I had never thought of giving out advance review copies!

*Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Find a workshop where you can get feedback on your writing, because that’s how you improve your craft.  Do Not be shy! All of us were beginners once.

*Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

http://woodswalker.weebly.com/

https://www.facebook.com/teslasignal

*What are you planning to write/publish next?

My next project is a sequel called Tesla’s Wavelength, about Tesla’s elder years when World War II looms on the horizon. A new and dynamic character is stepping in, and possibly she will demand a new book afterward.

A link to the book on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00WUP212I/

Author Interview – Kristy Carey

Kristy

Kristy Carey is an author and blogger with a passion for creativity.  With one publication under her belt, she plans to keep the momentum by focusing on the Urban Fantasy genre in future pieces.  She is currently splitting her time between writing and steampunk jewelry design. Her passion in both writing and design, is to mix together elements that don’t belong, and make them seem natural.  Kristy is currently working several short stories, including The Story Shoppe, an anthology of Short Stories and a retelling of fairy tales, The Charming Line.

Questions:

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

Wizard seeks to save the world, by way of long life and apprentices.

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

Honestly, I was doing an event called the 7 Day Story. In it, you take one week to go from Ideas to Publishable short story in 7 days. I had a Wizard sitting in a modern coffee shop, thinking of how life has changed over the years. At the time I’d been reading the Dresden Files and while the Wizard is in many ways inspired by Harry Dresden, I also worked hard to not copy him. This involved ‘No duster!’ in my thought process.

Which authors have influenced you?

Marjorie Weinman Sharmat the author of the Nate the Great books. I read them as a child and fell in love with mysteries.

Frank Peretti’s book ‘This Present Darkness’ is one of my favorite books. I love the speed at which the end moved.

David Eddings is by far my favorite author of all. I adore him.

Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files recently took over my LOVE of his writing.

Randy Henderson is a new author. I stumbled upon his first book a few months ago, and fell in love with it. As a bonus I had a chance to meet him at Sasquan this year.

Patricia Briggs.. I’ve only read one of her books so far, but I enjoyed it fully and can’t wait to read more.

Others that have inspired me would be Mary Higgins Clark, Janet Evonovich and a few others.

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Mysteries!!! Above all, I ADORE a good mystery. Noir style makes me happy.  😀 But a good one, where the detective is ALWAYS on the side of justice. The man can’t be bought, or romanced, into letting a killer go free.Urban Fantasy is top of my list. I love the mixture of fantasy with the modern world.

Fantasy in general.

I’d like to try Steampunk & Silkpunk, but I’ve yet to find one that holds me.

SciFi is enjoyable, but I’m not great with it in books.

What makes a book/story special for you?

Dialogue is something I look for in the story. I want to read a conversation and feel as if I’m just listening in on two people chatting… Or even think ‘I’ve had that conversation…”

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I live in Spokane, WA. Its a smallish city on the OTHER side of the state. Not the Rainy side. I don’t think its inspired me, except to send my stories to bigger places.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

The basic story only took me a day to write. The edits on the other hand took me quite a while to finish. Between letting it sit, sending it to friends to help edit, doing said edits and then letting it sit again…

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

Cover Artist is myself. I have some skills at it and at this point, do all my graphic design work.

Editor & Proofreader are friends who are skilled at it, and love me dearly. At this point, I can’t afford to hire someone.

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

That is a pain in the ass and the best thing I could ever do. ^^

Sometimes people read a story and want more, but don’t realize that the author may not have more to write. More than one person said that the Wandering Wizard was a Novel hiding in a Short Story. But I don’t have more to tell. The story is complete.  I have ‘started’ a sequel, but I have no idea if it’ll grow beyond the 1000 or so words I’ve started on it.

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

I’m pretty bad at overcoming hurdles. I tend to let them overwhelm me and take a break for unknown lengths of time. Its something I’m working on.

What would you do differently on a next project?

My next project is to be a series of shorts that I’ll release monthly, before releasing a complete book. Its my first shot at an actual novel, even if its done in a weird way.

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Write, edit, read and write some more. Honestly, those are what you need to do as a writer. Beyond that, its more a personal choice on what you do, how dedicated you are and such. There is no wrong way to write, except to write.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

Blog – http://wouldbesomebody.blogspot.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/KristyCareyAuthor & https://www.facebook.com/VintageFusionJewels

Twitter – https://twitter.com/Kristy_C

GoodReads – https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8434902.Kristy_Carey

Amazon – http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LWFIO00

Square Up Market – https://squareup.com/market/vintage-fusion-jewels

www.facebook.com/kristycareyauthor  |  www.facebook.com/vintagefusionjewels
www.vintagefusionjewels.etsy.com

What are you planning to write/publish next?

My next story is a retelling of fairy tales called The Charming Line. Each story has an intro, with a short blurb of the original story, followed by the ‘True Story’.

wizard