Author Interview – Shannon L. Perrine

Shannon

 

SL PERRINE is a wife to a mechanic and mother of four crazy teenagers (3 are boys) who eat her out of house and home. While raising her kids she has obtained three degrees, and now works to feed this bunch as a Registered Medical Assistant in a private physician’s office in the city she currently resides.
She is a native of Schenectady and Saratoga Springs, New York, having spent equal time growing up in both cities.

Writing has always been a passion of hers since she was young. She finally sat down and finished her first book in 2012 and self-published.

She has several projects in the works.

“If I never make a dime off my books I don’t care, I just love the fact that my work is out there for others to read.”
~SL PERRINE~

Questions:

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

Immortal Slumber is a story about an adopted girl who, on her 18th birthday discovers she’s a witch and all her friends knew about it.

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

I watched a few different movies with my husband and kept saying, “that story would be so much better if it went like this…” Finally my husband got tired of hearing me say that and told me to just start a new series.

Which authors have influenced you?

Originally, Nora Roberts. I had spent ten years getting borrowed books from my step-mom. Eventually I started going to the library, and I was never really sure what I was getting. I kept getting what I knew I liked until the library didn’t have anymore. So I picked up a couple YA Fantasy books and fell in love.

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Fantasy and Romance.

What makes a book/story special for you?

Originality… Nothing beats the feeling of not wanting to put a book down because your so interested in what’s coming next.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I divided my time between parents, so I grew up in both city and country settings in Central New York. I love the country setting, but find I choose more of a urban setting for my books. That’s just how they worked out.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I think this book took me close to 3 months. About 1.5 to write and then I procrastinated on the editing. I was waiting for a specific publisher to open for submissions. We haven’t gotten to the revision/editing yet.

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

Fortunately I have been given a contract to publish and my publisher will be handing it off to those she has on staff

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I learned that really anyone can write a book if they want to. You have to be dedicated to complete a trilogy/series if you start one. Which will keep you going if you have it in you to do it. Then just start another one. Keep the momentum.

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

There were so many days that I didn’t want to write, and so many I couldn’t. But eventually I had to allow myself those days to not write, so that way when I sat down to my story again, I was able to give it my full attention without feeling like the story was being forced. If I began to feel like I was stuck, I’d sit down with a book or a movie and just forget my book for a day or two. Then I was able to go back refreshed.

What would you do differently on a next project?

I don’t know that I would do anything different on my next project. Except maybe the story.

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

I’m asked this a lot. My only advise is this…if you want to write, then do it. Don’t think about it,don’t plan,just sit down and see what comes out.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

My new website is now up… http://www.slperrine.com

They can also contact me on Facebook. http://www.Facebook.com/slperrine

What are you planning to write/publish next?

Currently I have two series that I’m working on. Immortal Slumber is book one of The Crawford Witch Chronicles, an will be published by The Dragons Rockettship Publishing, LLC.

The other is The Beast Within Series and The Beast Within: book one is scheduled for release for March 2017 with Burning Willow Press, LLC.

 

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Author Interview – David K. Hulegaard

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With encouragement from friends and family, David K. Hulegaard wrote his first novel in 2010, and has cut a swath through Sci-Fi and Fantasy ever since. Lauded for his ability to create complex, meaningful characters, David’s Noble trilogy takes readers on an emotional journey that has garnered comparisons to the works of Philip K. Dick and Stephen King.
By day, David works at BioWare, a critically-acclaimed video game development studio known for its masterclass storytelling, and has played a role in popular franchises such as Mass Effect and Dragon Age.
David lives in Port Townsend, Washington with his wife Jennie, and their banana-obsessed Welsh Terrier Tobi. In his spare time, he enjoys video games, professional wrestling, and photography.
How would you describe your story in one sentence?
DAVID HULEGAARD: An adventure across the stars, in which a budding, young hero jeopardizes his critical mission to save a friend in peril.

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?
DH: Planet of Ice is book two in the Broken Stars series, and creator Tony Healey laid down some tremendous groundwork with the first book, Age of Destiny, for me to build upon. He set the tone and pace for the story, and introduced the world to Max, the series protagonist. For this book, I wanted to explore Max’s surrounding cast a bit deeper, and also examine the repercussions of the group’s actions in the first book. Max is destined to become the galaxy’s savior, but at only 16 years old, he still has much to learn. He can’t accomplish his goals by himself, and in Planet of Ice, the limits of friendship are tested.

Which authors have influenced you?
DH: Jim Butcher is definitely a huge influence of mine, but I’ve also learned so much from my peers, such as Bernard Schaffer, William Vitka, Simon Cox, and of course, Tony Healey himself. I feel blessed to have met and worked with such talented writers.

Which are your favorite literary genres?
DH: Sci-Fi and fantasy are my sweet spot, but my tastes can be all over the board at times. There’s nothing quite like a well-told ghost story, but once I finish it, my next read could very well be a sports drama.

What makes a book/story special for you?
DH: Complete immersion. I want something that connects me to the characters and makes me care about their story. If a story causes me to invest real emotion, then I’m hooked for the long haul and have a hard time putting it down. Those are the stories I’ll remember forever.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?
DH: I live in Port Townsend, Washington, which is a Victorian seaport town filled with history and natural beauty. Lots of people move here specifically for the inspiration and sense of community, so our little town is a hub of arts and culture. I definitely think being by the water has given me inspiration.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?
DH: I wrote the first draft for Planet of Ice in record time. After Tony and I talked through the plot, I hammered out a manuscript in about twelve weeks. We spent another four weeks on revisions and editing, which was great. Tony created these characters, and he was fantastic in helping me stay true to their voice and personalities.

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?
DH: This was my first time collaborating with another writer in this capacity, so I was a bit intimidated at first. I have nothing but the greatest respect for Tony, and as a fan of his work, I wanted him to love the direction I took as much as I did. Much to my delight, he only asked me to rethink a couple ideas, and after that he turned me loose. I appreciate how much trust he gave me to play in his sandbox, which included letting me create new characters and add lore to his existing universe. How cool is that?

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?
DH: The most important thing to remember is that you’ll never unlock your full potential without reading. Bury your nose into as many books relative to your genre as you can, and always set aside time to read. Then practice, practice, practice! As you develop your craft, keep writing, even if you think it’s not good enough. You’ll get better with every word you put on the page.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?
DH: Please visit me at http://www.davidhulegaard.com, and follow me on Twitter @HulegaardBooks. I love talking to people, so don’t be a stranger!

What are you planning to write/publish next?
DH: Still to be determined, but I’ve got a lot of options on my plate, and I couldn’t be more thrilled about that. I’ve got a couple of projects in development, and beyond that, I hear whispers of another book in the Broken Stars series. This is the busiest I’ve ever been as a writer, and I’m loving every minute of it!

 

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Author Interview – Tony Healey

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Tony Healey is a best-selling independent author based in the city of Brighton & Hove in the UK. His writing has been published alongside science-fiction legends Harlan Ellison and Alan Dean Foster. He has also had work appear with Piers Anthony, Scott Nicholson and J.R. Rain.
Most of his works are bestsellers, including his smash-hit science-fiction series Far From Home. Tony is married and has four daughters. For the latest on his various projects, visit www.tonyhealey.com

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

The best scifi adventure book you will ever read hahaha

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

David and I collaborated on this sequel to my book “Age Of Destiny” and it picks up right where that one left off, both in terms of plot and character development. It truly is Book 2 in this series, meaning that it takes everything that next step further than Book 1 did. I’m very proud of David’s work on this one. I think it’s some of his best writing to date.

Which authors have influenced you?

Stephen King (though his later stuff is a bit of a wash-out); Alan Dean Foster; Harlan Ellison; Arthur C Clarke; Lauren Beukes – to be honest I’m just pulling names out of a hat here. There are so many influences. Some of them, like William Vitka, Bernard Schaffer and AD Bloom are indie writers churning out their best work right now.

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Scifi, Fantasy, Action-Adventure, Literary (I’m thinking writers like John Irving and Michael Chabon here), mysteries and thrillers, a whole wide range really. I read what takes my fancy. And from a writing standpoint, it’s good to read across the board. It’s all fuel.

What makes a book/story special for you?

Characters. Emotion. Backstory. The need to know more.

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

Brighton, East Sussex in the United Kingdom. There are things I work into my stuff, but I’ll leave it to readers to figure it all out.

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

It was a very smooth process, working with Dave and we nailed the edits in a couple of weeks. This manuscript is about as tight as we can get it.

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I did the cover, and I served as editor (though Dave did substantial edits on his own), and a lovely lady gave the book a proofread when she read an ARC, which was very nice of her. There’s an important lesson for writers: network. If you’re creating great content, there will always be people willing to help you make it that much better.

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Slow and steady wins the race. You’ll get faster as you get better. Write tight prose – be ruthless with your own work. Simplify it down, make it barrel along at a lightning pace. I like to write no-nonsense prose with the odd flourish here and there. Try to be as active as you can, and have confidence. Try new things. Fuck it. When you’re done with your draft, try to eliminate any words that weaken your writing. Do a Find/Replace in Microsoft Word and have it highlight them. You can then go through your document from start to finish and decide which of those you REALLY need. If you don’t really need them, cut them out. Even if that means you have to restructure a sentence. Your work will be all the more stronger for it. There’s a lot to say, but the biggest would be: Don’t be precious about what you’ve written. Chill the fuck out and go with the flow. Roll with the punches.

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

www.tonyhealey.com and they can catch me on twitter as @fringescientist

What are you planning to write/publish next?

I have a mystery/thriller novel (the first in a series) sitting with publishers (Sorry, I can’t name names at this stage!) and I’m simultaneously working on the next entry in my Far From Home series, as well as a standalone novel that features a husband that goes missing as its inciting incident.

PLANET OF ICE is available NOW : http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AGP28TO

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Author Interview – K.M. Herkes

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K. M. Herkes is mostly quiet with a thirty-percent chance of loud, and everything else about her is subject to change without warning. She lives in the Midwest and works in a library, where she gets paid to play with books.  When she isn’t lost in her own imagination or making book recommendations, she’s outside in the garden, up to her elbows in dirt or wielding power tools with enthusiasm.
Professional development has included classroom teaching, animal training, aquaculture, horticulture, retail management, inventory operations, and customer service. Personal development is ongoing. Cats are involved.

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

Two series, so two sentences.

Stories of the Restoration. My characters are fighting to stay alive in a dystopian future that doesn’t look much different from the world of today

Rough Passages. Each story follows someone dealing with superpower-related crises in the present day of an alternate history where superpowers exploded onto the scene overnight in the middle of World War 2.

 

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

The SotR series started off because I wrote a zombie apocalypse book that took place about a hundred years the future. Then I decided I liked the corporate-driven dystopian society I’d created as a setting more than I liked the zombies. So I un-destroyed the world and wrote a ton of other stories in it.

The idea for Rough Passages came from reading a lot of comic books and thinking that superpowers are pretty disruptive. Most stories give powers to young adults who don’t have settled lives, or to people with nothing left to lose. So I dumped powers on people who had full, ordinary lives and jobs and families, just to see what would happen.

 

Which authors have influenced you?

The ones who create the kind of books I like to read most are Lois McMaster Bujold, Sharon Lee, Neil Gaiman, and Andre Norton. I love Ray Bradbury too, and I could go on and on. So many authors, so many influences.

 

Which are your favorite literary genres?

Space opera, dystopian science fiction, post-apocalypse stories, and fantasy of all kinds. Also mysteries. I enjoy a good whodunnit or a complicated thriller. I love romances too, although some of those are pretty much fantasies when push comes to shove. And poetry.

I’m a sucker for well-strung together words of any kind I guess.

 

What makes a book/story special for you?

Emotionally-complex characters, and writing that immerses me in the world those characters live in rather than telling me outright what’s going on.

An example: The stench of cheap cologne hit Mary as soon as she got home after work at midnight. That smell, plus the dirty dishes and takeout on the kitchen table, plus Liz’s bra on the bedroom door, added up to a one-night-stand in progress. Mary sighed. This was going to be a long weekend.

That entertains me more than, “Mary could tell Liz had an overnight guest from the mess they’d left everywhere. The woman’s horrible taste in men was almost as irritating as her refusal to pick up after herself. She sighed and resigned herself to another long, annoying weekend.

 

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I live in the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois, but I spent a lot of time on the west coast of the US before my family settled in the Midwest. I set down deep roots into the prairie soil once I got here, that much is certain. I’m sure it’s influenced me but I can’t point to anything specific.

 

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I don’t draft in the currently-accepted sense, so comparing the time spent is like comparing oranges and pineapple upside-down cake.

A first draft of a novel might take six months or two years, but once I write “The End” it will not substantially change in tone, length or storyline. My revisions don’t take long: weeks at most, for a novel 100k words or more. It’s all phrase-polishing, copy-editing, continuity-checks and edits to fix beta-reader concerns. True revision, where I rip story ideas apart, adding or removing plotlines and characters —all that goes on while I’m writing the “first draft.”

I’m not the only one who writes like that, but it’s not a popular system right now. If I dedicate myself to the writing aspect, I can put out a quality novel and a couple of shorts a year, so I’m not sweating how long it takes in the first place.

At least I think they’re good. There are plenty of days where I wonder if I shouldn’t do it the way everyone else does.

 

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

Yes, yes, and yes.  I tried volunteer copy-editors at first, but they missed too much. I’ve never hired a content editor, but that’s because I am an ego monster who chose self-publishing to write my stories my way. I am well aware they have issues. when it comes to commercial appeal and adhering to “standard story forms.” And I will confess that despite copy-editing and proofing there are still errors. I swear typos creep in while no one’s looking.

As far as art goes, I know enough graphic design to know I’m not a good enough artist to do my own words justice. I’ve done my own covers for the Rough Passages shorts out of financial necessity, but I’ll hire a professional for the book cover.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I’ve learned far too much to fit into one short interview. I’ve blogged thousands of words about my experiences. Most of it boils down to this: there is no One Right Way.

 

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

I write for an audience. For most of my life, that audience was imaginary, so I didn’t have much insecurity. The hardest part of my transition from writer to author has been the long wait for real readers to find my words, and the growing, gnawing fear that they’re ignoring me because my writing is awful. That fear has ebbed a bit now that I’ve had a few sales and some professional affirmation.

Still,knowing I have readers waiting inspires me to write more and faster. It’s that simple.

 

What would you do differently on a next project?

What should I do differently? I should be constantly building an audience for it now,  through personal networking online, generating buzz  with social media project updates and talking about my story all the time, and I should treat the finished books as a business product to be marketed, promoted and pushed.

Will I do those things? Probably not. At least,not to the extent the publishing pundits say I should. I have a serious problem enthusing about my work unprompted.

 

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Write. Write regularly and often as possible. Read writers who are better than you are. Write more. Listen to readers who tell you what doesn’t work, because you don’t have to change a single word, but knowledge is power.  Write more.

 

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

I have a website! At dawnrigger.com you can find my writing blog, my book reviews, character art, news and more. I also have a Facebook author page, and I’m on twitter as @doawnrigger. Basically, a user search on dawnrigger finds me on most social media outlets.

 

What are you planning to write/publish next?

Next up is Heartwood, a new Rough Passages Tale, along with a couple of other short stories.  I’ll be publishing a new Restoration novel in autumn if all goes well.

author website chock full o’ fun: dawnrigger.com

books & ebooks available for sale: www.amazon.com/author/kmherkes

 

 

 

Author Interview – C. J. McKee

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I have done some type of art most of my life and graphics as well as web design for the past ten years. I love the creative aspect of graphics and art as well as music. Creativity is utmost in my endeavors. I love to build something new from nothing.

I have been writing short stories and doing other forms of art since I was very young. Math was never my strong suit, but the art of writing? Ah, now that’s what I enjoyed the most. Anything creative appealed to me, and writing gave me so much more than merely painting a picture. I could create anything I wanted using the written word. I wrote mostly Sci-Fi or Fantasy stories, short but sweet. I have written other stories which I will post here so you can read and enjoy. I always have some form of writing going on which ranges from non-fiction to fiction.

QUESTIONS

-How would you describe your story in one sentence?

With the aide of Galddor the Dragon Sage, the Realms of Arydd are ruled by Dragons who watch over the land and beings to ensure their world is not destroyed by those who would use the land for dark purposes.

 

-What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

I had always read stories of dragons where they were hoarders or attacking villages or just plain evil. I wanted to write a novel or series where dragons were good and friendly toward humans and other beings alike.

 

-Which authors have influenced you?

Ray Bradbury, JRR Tolkien

 

-Which are your favorite literary genres?

Fantasy and Science Fiction

 

-What makes a book/story special for you?

Creating a world with characters that come alive and you get attached to.

 

-Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

Montana. I’ve always loved the mountains and thus the reason the dragons who rule the realms live and from where they can watch over the land.

 

-How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

It all depends on how much time I have to write. Total a few months or so. The first book has been written for years from original conception to editing.

 

-Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I did the cover designs. The editing/proofing was done by a professional editor.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

-Oh yes they did. In some cases the storyline or characters took on a life of their own and went down a direction I wasn’t expecting. I’ve learned to be open-minded. Sometimes things an editor suggest can be a great addition or change. Also I learned more about writing in general from editors, things that have helped my writing improve.

 

-What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

Music inspires me as does reading and role playing games. I always listen to Celtic music when writing. That and my Scottish heritage.

 

-What would you do differently on a next project?

Probably not much than I did on my last book. I will continue to grow and learn more, I don’t believe you ever stop.

 

-Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Get an editor when you’re done with the initial writing, or when you feel it’s ready to be edited. No matter how well you think you did, it’s important to have an editor go through it. It can cost you a bit, but it’s totally worth it. Learn as much as you can about social networking and the resources that are out there to help you get your book into the hands of readers.

 

-Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

They can go to my website www.mountaindragonmedia.com and I’m also on facebook:.  https://www.facebook.com/authorcjmckeeofficialpage   as well as twitter:  @MtDragonMedia

 

-What are you planning to write/publish next?

I am currently working on my third book in the Dragon Sage Chronicles; The Goblin Queen

 

Author Interview – Kindra Sowder

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Kindra Sowder was born and raised in Rancho Palos Verdes, CA until the age of 12, when her family moved to Spartanburg, SC. She graduated from high school in 2006 Me with full honors and as a member of her high school Literary Club and the Spanish Honor Society. In January 2014, she graduated with her second degree in Psychology, earning her an AA and BA in the field. She began to write long before this though, forming the basis for the Executioner Trilogy at the age of 15. She got married to her husband Edd Sowder in May 2014 and still lives in Spartanburg, SC where she is basing Burning Willow Press. “Follow the Ashes” has earned her nominations in the following categories: Best YA Author, Best Cover Art (cover art by Lisa Vasquez), and Best Female Indie Author in the IAFC Awards! Her work “Hello, My Name is…: A Miss Hyde Novella Volume 1” has also been nominated for Book of the Day’s 2015 Summer Book Awards Best in Horror Award.

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

A big city girl trying to make it in the indie world!

 

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

I am inspired by a lot of things. Music mostly. I can listen to a song and it invokes the image of a story in my mind that I write down as soon as it floods in. I have a tendency to stick with certain genres such as erotic horror, science fiction, Dystopian fiction and dark fantasy.

 

Which authors have influenced you?

Absolutely! I have been influenced by some of the greatest minds in literature including Stephen King, Anne Rice, Charlaine Harris, and Laurel K. Hamilton. (I have been compared to all of them)

 

Which are your favorite literary genres?

My favorite literary genres are the same ones I write in: Horror, science fiction, Dystopian fiction, and dark fantasy.

 

What makes a book/story special for you?

The characters. Always the characters. I need to be able to connect with them. If I can’t, the story means nothing. It may be a great story but you need great characters that readers can relate to to make it the best it can be.

 

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

I currently live in Spartanburg, SC. My hometown is actually Los Angeles, which has greatly influenced me. The Executioner Trilogy is based there as well as a new series I am writing. Another series is based where I live now.

 

How long you needed for writing this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

I have to say that time varies from book to book. Some have taken me a year. Some have taken me a month. Some have taken three months. It’s hard to put down an exact number.

 

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

I do. My current cover artist is Loraine Van Tonder. Lisa Vasquez did the first two books of the Executioner Trilogy. I don’t use any editor in particular. I also have a beta reader who helps me with voice, plot points, etc. named Charles Leeland. he is also my biggest fan.I also have my PA Samantha Achaia who has been an amazing helper along the way.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

I had heard that the literary scene was a hard place, but I learned very quickly that everyone was right. It’s hard to get your work published, but even harder to get your work recognized. I have to say that one unexpected event while I’ve been in the industry is losing my first cover artist.

 

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book? Again, music. it always helps. And if I have writer’s block I turn on a playlist, which I make specifically for each work, and the words start flowing again. My biggest hurdle has been the use of passive voice, which I am trying to curb.

 

What would you do differently on a next project?

I am already doing so many different things with each new project. Where do I even start?

 

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

Read, read, read….Always. It helps you develop and learn as a writer. Also, write every day. What you put down may not be great, it may be amazing, or complete and utter garbage, but keep writing.

 

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

I can be found on FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and at my websitewww.ksowderauthor.com. I also have a blog called “Inside the Mind of Kindra Sowder.”

 

What are you planning to write/publish next?

I have about five works in progress as of right now. I am working on two series, the new installment to the Miss Hyde Novellas, as well as a secret project I’ll be announcing next month so keep a look out.

 


    


  

 

Author Interview – Chasity Nicole

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Writing became a big part of my life in 2005 when a friend (Author Misti Blake) and I began writing stories with one another. I was still in high school at the time and we would write just for the fun and pure joy we experienced through writing. My writing took a bit of a hiatus when I finished high school and started college to earn my degree in Criminal Justice. That didn’t last very long, because a few months after starting college I was diagnosed with Tourette’s syndrome in 2009. Months later I found out the only thing that helped keep my ticks at bay was writing, and I picked the art back up. Wickedly Misunderstood was the first novel I began writing after my diagnosis and it all started with a dream. My advice to everyone is to find something that you love doing and do it. Don’t let anyone tell you can’t do it, because if you love it enough you’ll succeed. Do what you love, and love what you do. You never know what your dreams can lead you to accomplish.

 

How would you describe your story in one sentence?

 

  • One crazy rescue mission to save your friend and the love of your life.

 

What inspired you to write your story/characters/theme?

 

  • So the Valhaven Island Trilogy all started with a dream I had one night several years ago. I dreamt of a girl named Ember who had superhuman powers and watched her story unfold in my dreams and decided I’d type it up the next day and it just kept flowing into what it is today. As for most of the characters they are based off of friends, or at least the main roles in the story are based off of close friends and those that have impacted my life in some way.

 

Which authors have influenced you?

 

  • This is a tough question. A lot of authors have influenced me to write. I think my biggest influencers are Lewis Carrol and J.K. Rowling. Lewis Carrol is my favorite author. Misti Blake, a fellow indie author, is also a major influence for me because the days I really struggle she’s in my head screaming at me to keep moving forward. After all, if it wasn’t for writing with her in high school, my love for writing stories might not have reached the level of where it is today.

 

Which are your favorite literary genres?

 

  • Primarily, my novels are fantasy based. I do have short stories that are horror in nature as I don’t have a problem writing a seven-thousand word horror short story, I just can’t seem to get a full-length novel (although I’ve never actually tried). I’d say fantasy, sci-fi, and teen are typically where I dwell as far as reading goes as well. I like to stay in my imaginary world as much as possible.

 

What makes a book/story special for you?

 

  • If I can get hooked on a book really quick to where I can’t put it down then that book is golden for me. Lately, I’ve been in a reading funk, but I’m in the middle of releasing a novel and doing book trailers and covers and the holidays are approaching, so the funk is bound to happen. The ideal book for me has short chapters that aren’t over ten pages in length, because nothing is more frustrating than a chapter that’s forty pages long and you have to stop halfway through because of life. So, I like short, quick chapters that I can read quickly before life comes knocking at my door.

 

Where do you live? Did your hometown/country/culture influenced your story?

 

  • I live in good ‘ole North Carolina. My hometown didn’t influence this upcoming novel coming out but it is the basis for a novel I have in the works that I plan to release in the future. I grew up in Mount Pleasant, NC. And there are a few characters in the Valhaven Island Trilogy that are from NC but not from my hometown, and the character who is a derivative of myself isn’t from NC. But, a nice little twist does happen in Wicked Rescue Mission and you find out where Ember’s parents are originally from, and I don’t want to give that away.

 

How long did you need to write this book/for your first draft/ for your revision/editing process?

 

  • I’d say a little over a year and a half. I planned to release this past June but because my wedding was also in June my novel release got pushed back because I didn’t have the time to finish it and plan my wedding. Editing took around three-ish months. Designing the cover was the easiest thing and that took maybe a week, if that.

 

Did you hire a cover artist/editor/proofreader?

 

  • I’m a cover artist, so I do my own cover work. I also have a few friends that I trust to edit my work and my group is amazing and I wouldn’t trade them for anything in the world.

 

What have you learned while writing and publishing? Did unexpected things happened?

 

  • I’ve learned that I’m my biggest critic and that I’m always going to think the worst of things. It’s just how my brain works, and I’ve come to learn that most writers have this same mentality. As I said earlier, my novel was supposed to release in June, but because my wedding was in June I couldn’t devote the time to writing my novel and planning my wedding. So, I planned my wedding and set the novel aside for a little bit. There’s a lot of unexpected things that can pop up; hard-drive failures, losing your notebooks, pens dying while at work, etc.

 

What helped you to get inspired and overcome hurdles along the writing of your book?

 

  • My husband, mom, friends, and fans. I have friends that have read the book and they’ve messaged me wanting to know what happens next and they’ve been upset that it’s taken me over a year to publish the second book of the trilogy. They’ve been my drive to get it out there, because I go through times of just wanting to throw in the towel and give up. But, I think of those who want to know what happens next and that drives me to finish the story so I don’t have any straggling readers who have unanswered questions, because nothing is worse than having unanswered questions.

 

What would you do differently on a next project?

 

  • Committing more time to writing and less time to distraction. I allow myself to get distracted far too easily, and I think I’ve figured out a way to solve this problem, at least for my nano story. I’ve been streaming me typing it live for the last few days and because I’m streaming I’m not going to other sites when I should be typing. But, when I’m working on longer novels, like the last book in this trilogy I handwrite it, so I wouldn’t really be able to stream it as well.

 

Best piece (s) of advice for first time writers?

 

  • If you want to write and have ideas the best advice I can give you is to just write. Don’t worry what the world will think of what you have to say and don’t worry how it sounds. Don’t worry about grammar and things of that nature because that’s what editing is for. Just write your story and get it told, and worry about tightening it all up once you have it written. If you do it as you go, you’ll forget half your story and you’ll grow to dislike what you’re writing.

 

Where can readers contact you in the internet? Do you have a blog/website?

 

 

What are you planning to write/publish next?

 

  • Next I plan to publish a novel called The Moonstone Fairy which is my Nano story. I hope to release it around June or July next year and plan to release Rebuilding the Misunderstood, Book Three of the Valhaven Island Trilogy by the end of next year. I also have some anthologies coming out next year as well. We’ve all Been There: Tales of Tenacity April, 2016 and Carolina Horror Stories.